Can Hemp Fuel Replace North American Oil Production?


hemp fuel

I thought I was finished with blog posts for today, but that changed after I read an article while eating lunch. I felt I had to speak out AGAIN on this subject, especially since it is quite pervasive.

Here is an excerpt from the article I read today:

In its latest report, the Paris-based IEA forecasts that North America’s oil supply will grow by nearly 4 million barrels per day between 2012 to 2018, amounting to nearly 50% of global output growth over that period.

‘The shock waves of rising U.S. shale gas, light tight oil and Canadian oil sands production are reaching virtually all recesses of the global oil market,’ stated the IEA report.

The U.S. is experiencing an oil boom, in large part thanks to high world prices and new technologies, including hydraulic fracking, that have made the extraction of oil and gas from shale rock commercially viable.

The new supply surge comes as developing nations are set to consume more oil than developed countries for the first time.

The IEA says the shift will be seen this quarter, with demand from developing countries hitting 54% of the global total by 2018, up from 49% in 2012.” (http://money.cnn.com/2013/05/14/news/world/oil-iea-demand/) (Author’s note: I am often skeptical about news that I read from major corporate-owned news sources, and usually turn to other news sources. However, even if this is partly true/partly false/exaggerated/or whatever, it is STILL disturbing to see them touting oil distraction {fracking, etc.} as ‘commercially viable. That may be so, but it is NOT NOT NOT environmentally viable.)

In a previous post that I had written I mentioned the benefits of hemp (carbohydrate) fuel vs fossil (carbon) fuel. Here are a few of the key points:

* Hemp is renewable. Unlike fossil fuels, hemp is easily replenished AND healthy for the environment. One acre of hemp can produce as much paper as 4 acres of trees; in addition, hemp can be harvested every 90 days.

* Hemp fuel is biodegradable and non-toxic. Hemp fuel spills do not harm the earth. In fact, they would act more as a fertilizer than a hazardous spill.

* Hemp fuel burns cleanly; it does not cause create large amounts of carbon monoxide or hydrocarbons. *This brings up a good point. We have gone from a ‘carbohydrate’ society to a ‘carbon’ society. Biofuels and natural, clean materials were pushed aside and replaced by carbon products – fossil fuel-based and chemical-based products that harm the air and environment, and health.

(You can read the entire article here)

It is IMPERATIVE that we back off from dangerous, toxic fuels and methods of extraction and turn to hemp-based fuels. It’s cleaner, healthier, and there would be no shortages.

Hemp – The Best Biomass Energy Around!


Energy. We all use energy, and NEED it. There are many forms of energy. Some are clean and healthy for the environment, some are not.

There are 2 sources of energy – non-renewable and renewable.

Non-renewable sources of energy include fossil fuels and uranium (which is not a fossil fuel). Combustive fossil fuels emit dangerous elements into the air and environment – sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide. These are products that are the cause of pollution and acid rain.

Renewable sources of energy include hydropower, geothermal, solar, and biomass. These create less pollution and are cleaner to process.

Let’s look at biomass. Biomass, renewable energy, is biological material from living or recently living organisms. It can be used directly or converted to create other forms of energy. Examples of biomass are wood, crops, food waste, vegetable oils, and hemp.

In the 1900s Henry Ford, and others, realized the importance of using biomass as energy and fuel as opposed to using fossil energy. Henry Ford grew his own hemp, built a hemp car, and processed hemp fuel for his car – his dream was to have hemp fuel (a renewable, clean energy)  replace fossil fuel (a non-renewable less clean energy).

“Henry Ford recognized that up to 90 percent of all fossil fuel used inthe world today (coal, oil, natural gas, etc.) should long ago have been replaced with biomass such as: cornstalks, cannabis, waste paper and the like. Biomass can be converted to methane, methanol or gasoline at a fraction of the current cost of oil, coal, or nuclear energy – especially when environmental costs are factored in – and its mandated use would end acid rain, end sulfur- based smog, and reverse the Greenhouse Effect on our planet – right now!*
*Government and oil and coal companies, etc., will insist that burning biomass fuels is no better than using up our fossil fuel reserves, as far as pollution goes; but this is patently untrue. Why? Because, unlike fossil fuels, biomass comes from living (not extinct) plants that continue to remove carbon dioxide pollution from our atmosphere as they grow, through photosynthesis. Furthermore, biomass fuels do not contain sulfur. This can be accomplished if hemp is grown for biomass and then converted through pyrolysis (charcoalizing) or biochemical composting into fuels to replace fossil fuel energy products.*
*Remarkably, when considered on a planet-wide, climate-wide, soil-wide basis, cannabis is at least four and possibly many more times richer in sustainable, renewable biomass/cellulose potential than its nearest rivals on the planet – cornstalks, sugarcane, kenaf trees, etc.” (The Emperor Wears No Clothes, Jack Herer)

It is a known fact that hemp cleans the air as it grows, and cleans the soil as well. Hemp is carbon negative. (Fossil fuels are NOT.)

Ethanol and Methanol can be produced from hemp, and these fuels are cleaner. They produce less carbon monoxide than fossil fuels and have a higher octane.

In the past, wood was used for cooking fuel and heating fuel. However, the deforestation lowers the air quality (as well as the burning of the wood fuel). It takes 20-40 years for a new crop of trees to be at the harvestable age.

Hemp, however, produces approximately 2-3 crops per year; it is 77% cellulose (trees are 60%) and hemp. It is a known fact that hemp cleans the air as it grows, and cleans the soil as well. Hemp is also carbon negative.

It makes sense, from an environmental point of view as well as a health point of view, that hemp should be used as a clean, renewable source of energy.