I’ve Gone Shampoo-Free and I’ll Never Go Back!


August 7 No Shampoo Experiment

 

A few days ago I started a ‘no shampoo’ experiment…for a few reasons.

 

First, I didn’t like spending a lot of money on shampoo. Second, cheap shampoos stripped my hair so badly and made it dry and frizzy, then I’d have to finish with conditioner or creme rinse or detangler so that I could run a brush through it when I was finished. Third, I wasn’t pleased with all the chemicals that were going on my hair, my body, and into the septic/drain field. So, I started washing my scalp with a mixture of baking soda and water (1 part baking soda to 4 parts water). I didn’t worry about the rest of my hair, because when rinsing, the solution would have covered it anyway. I do a quick scalp massage, then rinse. Next, I do a rinse with organic apple cider vinegar (1 part vinegar to 4 parts water). And then the finishing touch: a cool water rinse.

 

All I can say is, WOW! My hair feels softer, more supple, and I do NOT need conditioner or detangler afterward. The natural oils keep it moisturized. My hair feels healthier, stronger, and more supple (which is great for me, since I’ve long hair and plan on growing it longer)! If you have gone shampoo free, or plan on trying it, please let me know your results. If you want, send a photo and I’ll post it in a follow up blog!

 

Namasté

 

Afterthought: If you are concerned about smelling like a freshly made salad vinaigrette, don’t worry! The faint vinegar scent dissipates in a few minutes and then all you are left with is hair that smells clean and fresh!

 

 

Hemp Making A Comeback ~ As A Building Material


You’ve heard that it is an excellent nutritional source, and that it is an excellent material for textiles. But did you know that industrial hemp is an exceptional substance for construction?

Let’s start at the ground level. Hemcrete as a foundation is the perfect basis for a structure. Hemcrete is a substance consisting of hemp hurds, lime, sand, plaster, cement and water. When dry, it is stone-hard; however, it also is flexible.

As insulation, hemp is ideal. It ‘breathes’ and helps clean the air, regulates humidity, is mildew resistant, fire resistant, insect resistant and waterproof when used above ground. The R-value of hemp insulation is comparable to other fiber insulation materials, about R-3.5 per inch.

Hemp composite boards (similar to plywood) have been in the making and tested by Washington State University. It was found that the hemp composite boards were 2 ½ times stronger than wood AND 3 time more elastic than wood composites. Similar to the hempcrete, hemp composite boards are water resistant.

Buildings and structures account for approximately 40% of CO2 emissions in the United States, thus creating a larger demand for environmentally wise building products. Homes constructed with hemp have a carbon neutral or carbon negative impact on the environment.

Because of the multitude applications of hemp, a home can be constructed almost entirely of hemp, even down to hemp plastic pipes (flexible and resistant to cracking) and roofing tiles, hemp carpets, and hemp-oil based paints.

Environmental responsibility and sustainability are becoming more prevalent; it makes sense that industrial hemp is the way to go when it comes to construction. And, most importantly, hemp building materials are 100% recyclable.

How wonderful it would be to see more homes and buildings taking advantage of hemp, a perfect non-toxic, renewable, earth-friendly source.